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Gout attack treatment - Online visit

4.9
5 stars
192
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Virtual visit
starting at

$30.00*

*Prices vary by location
Get virtual care from a licensed clinician quickly—no appointment necessary.
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Answer some health questions and connect with a clinician
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Pick up any prescribed medication at a pharmacy of your choice or have it delivered
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Pay a flat visit fee without surprise bills (insurance not accepted)
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Your health data is secure and protected by our practices and by law
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Is this visit right for me?

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Ages 18-64
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You’ve been diagnosed with gout
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You’re having gout attack symptoms like sudden joint pain and swelling
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Your symptoms are on your big toe, elbow, or finger
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You're not pregnant
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WHAT CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

Commonly prescribed gout attack treatments

Your clinician will determine which (if any) gout treatment is medically appropriate for you based on your symptoms and health history. If you're prescribed gout medication, pick it up at a pharmacy of your choice. Choose Amazon Pharmacy for free delivery and transparent Prime pricing. The cost of your prescribed medication may be covered by health insurance.
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Colchicine
(Colcrys)
Reduces inflammation
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Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
Examples include indomethacin (Indocin), diclofenac (Voltaren), and naproxen (Aleve)
Your clinician won’t prescribe methylprednisolone (Medrol) dose packs, prednisone, or uric acid-lowering gout medications like allopurinol (Zyloprim) or febuxostat (Uloric).
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How it works

Treatment for ages 18-64
Answer some questions
We'll ask some questions about your symptoms, health history, and what you're looking for.
Connect with a clinician
Choose from multiple online providers and between video or message-only (if available in your state).
Get a treatment plan and medication, if prescribed
Your clinician will determine what's medically appropriate for you and send any prescriptions to a pharmacy of your choice.
Follow up for 14 days
You'll have unlimited messaging with your clinician for 14 days after you receive your treatment plan. Ask questions about your treatment, or change or adjust your medication.
Multiple online clinics to choose from
Amazon Clinic partners with online clinics to deliver treatment. All partners have U.S.-licensed clinicians and adhere to strict regulatory standards.
Compare prices, response times, and available treatments to pick the online clinic that works best for you.
Frequently asked questions
What causes gout attacks?
Gout is a kind of arthritis caused by high levels of uric acid in the bloodstream (hyperuricemia). When your body produces too much uric acid or—more likely—doesn't excrete enough uric acid in your urine, crystals can form in the joints. These uric acid crystals, called monosodium urate (MSU), lead to gout attack symptoms like pain and inflammation.

What causes hyperuricemia? Diets high in alcohol, fruit sugar (fructose), and purine-rich meat (like organ meat and seafood) can contribute to high uric acid levels in the body, but research shows that genetics and obesity tend to be the biggest risk factors.
How long does a gout attack last?
A gout attack, also known as a gout flare or a gouty arthritis flare, can last from a few hours to a few weeks if left untreated. Symptoms usually come on suddenly, with the most severe pain occurring within the first 24 hours. Joint discomfort can last much longer.
What relieves a gout attack?
Clinical research has shown that the gout medication colchicine, which is derived from a plant that humans have used to treat joint swelling for thousands of years, can help relieve gout pain within 24 to 36 hours. Colchicine can also be used for longer-term management of chronic gouty arthritis.

In addition to colchicine, clinicians often prescribe NSAIDs for gout pain relief.

People who can't take colchicine or NSAIDs may benefit from corticosteroid gout treatment, but this isn't available through Amazon Clinic.
Is gout curable?
Gout isn't curable, but the monosodium urate crystals that cause gout can dissolve when the body's concentration of uric acid drops below a certain level. You can talk to a trusted healthcare provider like a primary care physician (PCP) about taking preventative gout medicine to lower your urate levels. These uric acid-lowering medications include allopurinol (Zyloprim) and febuxostat (Uloric).

The American College of Rheumatology also recommends the following diet and lifestyle guidelines to prevent gout flares:
• If you're obese, start a weight loss program

• Limit your consumption of beverages sweetened with high fructose corn syrup, like sodas and fruit juices

• Limit your consumption of alcohol, especially beer

• Limit your consumption of purines, which tend to be highest in shellfish and organ meats
What does having gout mean for my overall health?
Gout often overlaps with other health conditions, particularly high blood pressure (hypertension), chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research has also shown that there's a higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack in the 120 days after a gout flare.

Your clinician will consider all overlapping health conditions when prescribing gout treatment.
What types of visit can I have?
Video visits are available in all 50 states and D.C. Message-only visits are available in 34 states. To see your visit options, first choose your state.
Can I use my health insurance to pay for a visit and/or medication?
Amazon Clinic doesn't accept health insurance for visits at this time. You can submit a claim to your insurance provider for reimbursement, but we can’t guarantee they’ll reimburse you.

If you normally use insurance to pay for your medications, you can do that with medications prescribed through Amazon Clinic. Amazon Pharmacy accepts most insurance plans. For other pharmacies, please talk with your pharmacy directly about insurance coverage. The cost of medication isn’t included in the cost of your visit.
How does Amazon Clinic protect my health information?
Amazon Clinic protects your health information by strictly following the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). HIPAA governs what Amazon Clinic and your healthcare providers can do with your medical information, as well as your contact and payment information. Amazon Clinic doesn’t and will never sell your personal information. Learn more on our privacy page.
Sources
1. Cipolletta, E., Tata, L. J., Nakafero, G., Avery, A. J., Mamas, M. A., & Abhishek, A. (2022). Association Between Gout Flare and Subsequent Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Gout. JAMA, 328(5), 440–450. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9346550/
2. FitzGerald, J. D., Dalbeth, N., Mikuls, T., Brignardello-Petersen, R., Guyatt, G., Abeles, A. M., Gelber, A. C., Harrold, L. R., Khanna, D., King, C., Levy, G., Libbey, C., Mount, D., Pillinger, M. H., Rosenthal, A., Singh, J. A., Sims, J. E., Smith, B. J., Wenger, N. S., Bae, S. S., … Neogi, T. (2020). 2020 American College of Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Gout. Arthritis care & research, 72(6), 744–760. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10563586/
3. McKenzie, B. J., Wechalekar, M. D., Johnston, R. V., Schlesinger, N., & Buchbinder, R. (2021). Colchicine for acute gout. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 8(8), CD006190. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8407279/